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20121222
20121230
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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
the story stocks work, sometimes everyone else owns them, then they want to get out. > what about google? is this a stock to own? at one point it was during the past year. > > google has done a great job. all three of these companies, facebook, google, and apple, of course, are leading the pack in terms of driving this stock market. and of course, google got back in favor and has had excellent business results. and of course, the final indignant thing for apple was that they had to have google maps go back on the iphones. but i think all three of them are going to be great investments over the next several years. it is just a matter of the timing. so, if you got into facebook in the low, that is great. if you can hold on and maybe pick up some apple here. that is also good. and i think google is going to continue to do well. > thank you matt, and happy trades to you in the new year. > > thank you. americans spent 2012 tuning in to election coverage and those political ads. when it was all said and done, campaigns shelled out $6 billion. paul eggers gives us a look at the the money trail
with google now complete. introducing droid dna by htc. it's not an upgrade to your phone. it's an upgrade to yourself. [ male announcer ] when diarrhea hits, kaopectate stops it fast. powerful liquid relief speeds to the source. fast. [ male announcer ] stop the uh-oh fast with kaopectate. >>> the southwest uk is getting hammered with rain causing some travel nightmares. it has to rain a lot in the uk to make any kind of difference. they're used to it. there is floodwater everywhere in devon, england. the drenching rain is causing massive travel problems. with roads and rail lines as well washed over. that's affecting the commute for people. britain's lined up sandbags on the weekend and now officials are warning people about even trying to get out on the roads. parts of wales and scotland are also getting flooded. >>> people in chile and argentina are watching a volcano that straddled the border between the two countries. the volcano has been spewing smoke into the sky. ash has been raining down on surrounding towns. you can see it there. almost looks like snow. it is ash. i'm joined now
following santa and his reindeer, but google earth is also tracking him. so you have a choice now. google or norad. which is using bing maps this year. we're not sure what maps santa uses. maybe we'll find out one of these days. we put a week's worth of bad odors in a home. some aerosols may just mix with them. can febreze really remove them? we asked real people what they thought. take a deep breath for me. describe the smell. it's very pleasant. fresh. some kind of flower maybe? remove the blindfold... awww, oh yuck! i didn't smell any of that! febreze air effects doesn't mix, it actually removes odors. [ laughs ] wow, that's incredible. just another way febreze helps you breathe happy. a regular guy with an irregular heartbeat. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended
in the question of somebody wants to know why google can make money and the times can. part of it is because google is a consolidator. they pay the times for a period there is a lot of money is getting cheap. that is the present question. one thing we should also say because it is part of the puzzle, they basically when the times went public, we lost fort shares. your pension fund, there may be some time shares. all of these shares everybody owns as a capitalization of 144 million. all of them which we all alone get to relax five minutes before the board of directors of 14. you will said, who elected the other eight? the b shares are owned by the family trust. they on the b shares. what will happen? will the times go the way of the bank wrapped a journal or not? it used to be sort it would be impossible because the family trusts has done very well. the family -- we're talking four generations of cousins or five generations. i think over 1000 people are involved with a very large number. the crest discusses this. it is possible these people will start to borrow. some of them but they needed t
-end reflections from social media. >> holman: facebook, twitter,th google-- the online giants areva providing more authority to online users by using algorithms that gauge their "collective curiosity" to evaluate the year. hari sreenivasan examines the media trend on the rundown.ntpe plus, if a headhunter calls, should you answer?in employment expert nick korkodilos offers answers to that and other questions on making sense. i all that and more is on our web site, newshour.pbs.org. gwen? >> ifill: and that's the newshour for tonight. on wednesday, we'll have jeff's second story from athens, about how ordinary greeks are coping in tough times.on we'll see you online, and again here tomorrow evening. i'm gwen ifill. thank you, merry christmas, and good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financialor literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations.ra and... >> this program was made possible b
using their own money, the new space investors -- allen, musk, bezos, the google guys -- every one of these guys was a little kid during apollo. coincidence? ok, let's move on to spaceshipone. i think paul wanted to do this for legacy. as it turns out, spaceshipone has been a profitable business for them. can you imagine an investor going out into the desert and having people do research where the actuaries, the insurance companies do that hole in one insurance, gave $10 million to paul? they said it could not be done. he went out and did that because of his curiosity. now, you would have thought that $20 million or so -- well, that is just pocket change if you have $126 billion, right? he got almost half his money back. richard branson gave him another couple million to put a virgin on it for two flights. he got half his money back right away. he has been licensing the technology for the tethered reentry and is still turning back on it. that is weird. can you imagine, at nasa doing space research and it is probable? -- profitable? no, you cannot imagine that. [laughter] you guys a
facebook and google and zynga. these companies are all going public with dueled clash -- dual class shareholders. i call these private companies in the closet, because they are really finding a way to make sure that they will not be subject to short-term budget short-term shareholders. i am not applauding this development. i think maybe it goes a little too far in the unaccountability direction. but it does suggest that our conventional notions of corporate governance, where directors are pressured to listen to shareholders and to focus on share price, is dysfunctional enough. that is a big part of the story about my public companies are disappearing. -- about why public companies are disappearing. >> thank you so much for coming. i have a question related to the shareholder aspect of things. there is a really great shareholder movement, organizing to mitigate some of these problems. there is whole movement to create new shareholders as well as to increase awareness. do you see this movement as the problem, and any change that can come from? >> again, a wonderful impression -- a won
at companies that are going public like facebook and google and zynga -- these companies are all going public with dual class shareholders. i call these private companies in the closet, because they are really finding a way to make sure that they will not be subject to short-term budget short-term shareholders. i am not applauding this development. i think maybe it goes a little too far in the unaccountability direction. but it does suggest that our conventional notions of corporate governance, where directors are pressured to listen to shareholders and to focus on share price, is dysfunctional enough. that is a big part of the story about why public companies are disappearing. >> thank you so much for coming. i have a question related to the shareholder aspect of things. i have been involved in some shareholder activism -- there is a really great shareholder movement, organizing to mitigate some of these problems. like environment of degradation. -- environmental degradation. there is whole movement to create new shareholders as well as to increase awareness. do you see this movement as the
, like facebook and google and zynga. and linkedin. these companies are all going public with dual class shareholders. the founders are retaining control. i call these private companies in the closet, because they are really finding a way to make sure that they will not be subject to short-term budget short-term shareholders. they're making sure that short- term shareholders don't have any votes. i am not applauding this development. i think maybe it goes a little too far in the unaccountability direction. but it does suggest that our conventional notions of corporate governance, where directors are pressured to listen to shareholders and to focus on share price, is dysfunctional enough. that is a big part of the story about why public companies are disappearing. that's a great question. >> any other questions? >> thank you so much for coming. i have a question related to the shareholder aspect of things. i've been involved in shareholder activism. there is a really great shareholder movement, organizing to mitigate some of these problems. like environmental degradation and labor. there
it up on google 20 months ago, it would have something to do with coal and carbon, but this is about automatic cuts going into place known as sequestration. host: how did this come about? where is it headed? caller: as we recall from last year, there was a crisis over raising the debt ceiling. republicans demanded some cuts from congress. they agreed to $1 trillion in cuts, they handed over $1.50 trillion to the super committee. because they failed to come up with a deal that could be approved by congress and the president, those automatic cuts go into effect, $1.20 trillion over 10 years. the first cut will go into effect on january 2 of 2013. host: how are the defense sequestration cuts being applied? are we sure? guest: we are not exactly sure, but the law says that every program and activity must be cut by the same percentage. there may be some flexibility, but the understanding is that you have to go across the board and cut everything by the same amount, estimated to be about 9.4% in the case of the pentagon. host: what is on the table for the pentagon? guest: everything can be
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)